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Geographica Helvetica
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Volume 40, issue 1
Geogr. Helv., 40, 25-29, 1985
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-40-25-1985
© Author(s) 1985. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Geogr. Helv., 40, 25-29, 1985
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-40-25-1985
© Author(s) 1985. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  31 Mar 1985

31 Mar 1985

Bergsturz Amden 1974

A. E. Scheidegger A. E. Scheidegger
  • Technische Universität Wien Institut für Theoretische Geodäsie und Geophysik Gußhausstraße 27–29, 1040 Wien, Austria

Abstract. On January 21, 1974, a land slide occurred near Amden in the Canton of St. Gall in Switzerland. This slide is of considerable scientific interest because it had been threatening for some time so that the authorities had arranged for measurements to be made. Thus, creep-curves for the slide during the preparation period are available. These could be compared with the daily rain rates for the nearby meteorological Station at Weesen. It was found that in the initial "slow" phase of the slide, the movements were mainly a response to the rainfall; the delay time between the slide velocity and the rain was 12 days. Finally in January, 1974, however, the movement became exponential which indicated the occurrence of a progressive failure. In addition, dynamic studies have been made in the region: The slide conforms exactly to the general prediction curve and its buildup fits entirely into the local geotectonic stress pattern.

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