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Geographica Helvetica
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Volume 54, issue 4
Geogr. Helv., 54, 242–251, 1999
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-54-242-1999
© Author(s) 1999. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Geogr. Helv., 54, 242–251, 1999
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-54-242-1999
© Author(s) 1999. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  31 Dec 1999

31 Dec 1999

The end of "Made in Hong Kong"? De-industrialisation and industrial promotion policy in Hong Kong

W. Breitung W. Breitung
  • Abteilung Humangeographie/Stadt- und Regionalforschung, Departement Geographie, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 16, 4056 Basel, Switzerland

Abstract. This article explores spatial aspects of Hong Kong's deindustrialisation, related both to the development of closer cross-border ties and to Hong Kong's evolution as a global city. Industrial promotion has always had its place in the generally non-interventionist economic policy ofthe government. However, under the new political and economical conditions industrial promotion has moved up on the agenda. In particular, the promotion of high-tech industries is given special governmental attention. The author wams that the plans for re-industrialising Hong Kong may be based on an obsolete view of the city: the city as an isolated entity rather than as the cross-border economic agglomeration that it is growing into. The aim should be to develop a strong and productive industrial base with intra-regional co-operation for the whole agglomeration instead of just for Hong Kong.

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