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Volume 73, issue 3 | Copyright
Geogr. Helv., 73, 227-239, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-73-227-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Standard article 13 Sep 2018

Standard article | 13 Sep 2018

Ungleichheit, Intersektionalität und Alter(n) – für eine räumliche Methodologie in der Ungleichheitsforschung

Friederike Enßle and Ilse Helbrecht Friederike Enßle and Ilse Helbrecht
  • Geographisches Institut, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Abstract. This article explores the interplay of inequality, space and age(ing) from an intersectional perspective. It argues, that a spatial research methodology is most fruitful in order to include age(ing) in debates on intersectionality and inequality. Drawing on geographical gerontology and inequality research, we scrutinize the research gap at the intersection of these fields: While age is a neglected factor in intersectional debates on inequality, questions of power are hardly addressed by geographical gerontology. To bridge this research gap, we propose space as methodological perspective. By showing how the negotiation of age(ing) varies in different spatial settings, the article emphasises the value of spatial approaches to analyse the two faces of age(ing) – age as a marker of difference and ageing as a process. On a larger scale, the article points to the potential of a spatial methodology to approach the complexity of intersectionality.

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This article argues for a spatial research methodology to better understand the interplay of inequality, intersectionality and age(ing). Drawing on places such as nursing homes or housing projects, the article scrutinizes the negotiation of old age in different spatial contexts, and how this is linked to other markers of difference, e.g. gender or ethnicity. On a larger scale, the article points to the potential of a spatial methodology to approach the complexity of intersectionality.
This article argues for a spatial research methodology to better understand the interplay of...
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