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Volume 73, issue 4
Geogr. Helv., 73, 285-300, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-73-285-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Die Postsäkularitätsdebatte und die Geographie

Geogr. Helv., 73, 285-300, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-73-285-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Standard article 24 Oct 2018

Standard article | 24 Oct 2018

Understanding the geographies of religion and secularity: on the potentials of a broader exchange between geography and the (post-) secularity debate

Georg Glasze and Thomas M. Schmitt Georg Glasze and Thomas M. Schmitt
  • FA University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Geography, Wetterkreuz 15, 91058 Erlangen, Germany

Abstract. For a long time, the mainstream of social and cultural geography seems to have implicitly accepted that religion is becoming obsolete and is of little social significance. However, since the 1990s, religion has aroused new interest in the social sciences in general, and to some extent also in social and cultural geography. Against this backdrop, a controversial discussion has started in geography on the relevance of theories of secularisation and the notion of post-secularity, as well as on possible contributions to these debates. The paper introduces the interdisciplinary debate on revisions of theories of secularisation and the promotion of post-secular perspectives, referring, among others, to Jürgen Habermas, Peter Berger, José Casanova, and Talal Asad. In a second step, we argue that an understanding of post-secularity that focuses on the contingency and context-dependent delimitation of the secular and the religious promises to be fruitful for social and cultural geography and can help us to understand the geographies of religion and secularity.

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For a long time, the mainstream of social and cultural geography seems to have implicitly accepted that religion is becoming obsolete. However, since the 1990s, religion has aroused new interest in the social sciences in general, and to some extent also in social and cultural geography. The paper introduces the interdisciplinary debate on theories of secularisation and the promotion of post-secular perspectives and shows the potential of this debate for social and cultural geography.
For a long time, the mainstream of social and cultural geography seems to have implicitly...
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